ecowatchorg:


ExxonMobil Ignores IPCC Warning, Vows to Burn All Oil Reserves
The oil company argues that, because it was “highly unlikely” that governments would address climate change, it was going to carry on drilling …
Exxon gives a big “F-YOU” to everyone. 
SEE MORE:
http://ecowatch.com/2014/04/14/exxon-climate-mitigation-futile-burn-oil-reserves/

ecowatchorg:

ExxonMobil Ignores IPCC Warning, Vows to Burn All Oil Reserves

The oil company argues that, because it was “highly unlikely” that governments would address climate change, it was going to carry on drilling …

Exxon gives a big “F-YOU” to everyone. 

SEE MORE:

http://ecowatch.com/2014/04/14/exxon-climate-mitigation-futile-burn-oil-reserves/

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

theserpentscoil:

Nam Hou River, at Nong Khiaw, Laos

theserpentscoil:

Nam Hou River, at Nong Khiaw, Laos

(via manmak)

ecosavvyrebel:

Best PSA on meat I’ve ever encountered so far
dothegreenthing:Enjoy Responsibly by Dan and Rachael 3/23
Dan Norris and Ray Shaughnessy, creative directors at Wieden + Kennedy, are certified meat addicts – and they wanted to create a poster that encouraged themselves and others to go easy on the meat:  
“We’re pretty greedy, especially when it comes to meat, so it seemed like an obvious subject for us to deal with. We hope that by encouraging people to ‘Make Meat a Treat’ we can help them to reduce their meat consumption which in turn will help to reduce the industry’s CO2 footprint. And from our selfish meat-eating point of view, we’re looking at it as a form of carbon off-setting so we can keep enjoying it too. It’s a classic win-win-win situation.”
Why?
Meat production is responsible for 18% of greenhouse gas emissions – more than all the cars, trucks, planes, trains, and ships in the world combined.

ecosavvyrebel:

Best PSA on meat I’ve ever encountered so far

dothegreenthing:Enjoy Responsibly by Dan and Rachael 3/23

Dan Norris and Ray Shaughnessy, creative directors at Wieden + Kennedy, are certified meat addicts – and they wanted to create a poster that encouraged themselves and others to go easy on the meat:  

“We’re pretty greedy, especially when it comes to meat, so it seemed like an obvious subject for us to deal with. We hope that by encouraging people to ‘Make Meat a Treat’ we can help them to reduce their meat consumption which in turn will help to reduce the industry’s CO2 footprint. And from our selfish meat-eating point of view, we’re looking at it as a form of carbon off-setting so we can keep enjoying it too. It’s a classic win-win-win situation.”

Why?

Meat production is responsible for 18% of greenhouse gas emissions – more than all the cars, trucks, planes, trains, and ships in the world combined.

thegreenurbanist:

vicemag:

Crude Journalism: Chevron Bought a Newspaper to Mask Its Bad Record on Safety Abuses
Richmond is tucked into California’s western tricep, a former wine town with a population just over 100,000. Under the administration of Mayor Gayle McLaughlin, the town is the largest city in the United States with a Green Party mayor. It’s also an oil town—in 1901, Standard Oil set up a tank farm, choosing the location for its easy access to San Francisco Bay. Soon after, a western terminus of the Santa Fe Railroad was built in Richmond to handle the outflux of crude. Over the course of the 20th century, Standard Oil became the Standard Oil Company of California (SOCAL), and later, Chevron.
Throughout the 90s, the Richmond refinery was fined thousands of dollars for unsafe conditions, explosions, major fires, and chemical leaks, as the plant oozed chlorine and sulfur trioxide into Richmond’s atmosphere. In August of 2012, the Richmond refinery exploded after Chevron ignored the warning of corroding pipes from the local safety board. The disaster was linked to aging pipes, which were simply clamped instead of replaced altogether. Some 15,000 residents in the surrounding area were forced to seek medical treatment, and Chevron’s CEO, John Watson, got a $7.5 million dollar raise.
Continue

“There may be a lot of jobs in oil, but there aren’t any jobs at all when the town you live in is on fire.”

thegreenurbanist:

vicemag:

Crude Journalism: Chevron Bought a Newspaper to Mask Its Bad Record on Safety Abuses

Richmond is tucked into California’s western tricep, a former wine town with a population just over 100,000. Under the administration of Mayor Gayle McLaughlin, the town is the largest city in the United States with a Green Party mayor. It’s also an oil town—in 1901, Standard Oil set up a tank farm, choosing the location for its easy access to San Francisco Bay. Soon after, a western terminus of the Santa Fe Railroad was built in Richmond to handle the outflux of crude. Over the course of the 20th century, Standard Oil became the Standard Oil Company of California (SOCAL), and later, Chevron.

Throughout the 90s, the Richmond refinery was fined thousands of dollars for unsafe conditions, explosions, major fires, and chemical leaks, as the plant oozed chlorine and sulfur trioxide into Richmond’s atmosphere. In August of 2012, the Richmond refinery exploded after Chevron ignored the warning of corroding pipes from the local safety board. The disaster was linked to aging pipes, which were simply clamped instead of replaced altogether. Some 15,000 residents in the surrounding area were forced to seek medical treatment, and Chevron’s CEO, John Watson, got a $7.5 million dollar raise.

Continue

There may be a lot of jobs in oil, but there aren’t any jobs at all when the town you live in is on fire.”

ecowatchorg:

9 of the Dirtiest U.S. Fisheries Exposed

Today, Oceana released a new report exposing nine of the dirtiest fisheries in the U.S. These nine fisheries combined throw away almost half of what they catch and are responsible for more than 50 percent of all reported bycatch in the U.S., injuring and killing thousands of protected and endangered species every year …

SEE MORE:

http://ecowatch.com/2014/03/20/dirtiest-u-s-fisheries-exposed/

An environmental student sharing things green.


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