Tagged with green RSS

blu3rsx:

“16-Year-Old Egyptian Scientist Finds Way to Turn Plastic Waste Into $78 Million of Biofuel!”
What Azza proposes is to break down the plastic polymers found in drinks bottles and general waste and turn them into biofuel feedstock. (This is the bulk raw material that generally used for producing biofuel.) It should be noted that this is not a particularly new idea, but what makes Azza stand out from the crowd is the catalyst that she is proposing. She says that she has found a high-yield catalyst called aluminosilicate, that will break down plastic waste and also produce gaseous products like methane, propane and ethane, which can then be converted into ethanol.



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blu3rsx:

16-Year-Old Egyptian Scientist Finds Way to Turn Plastic Waste Into $78 Million of Biofuel!

What Azza proposes is to break down the plastic polymers found in drinks bottles and general waste and turn them into biofuel feedstock. (This is the bulk raw material that generally used for producing biofuel.) It should be noted that this is not a particularly new idea, but what makes Azza stand out from the crowd is the catalyst that she is proposing. She says that she has found a high-yield catalyst called aluminosilicate, that will break down plastic waste and also produce gaseous products like methane, propane and ethane, which can then be converted into ethanol.

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(via socialuprooting)



Great Garbage Patch

Photographer Chris Jordan specializes in large-scale works that depict the magnitude of our consumerism and its impact on our environment. In one of the most emotional presentations at PopTech 2009, Jordan shares heart-wrenching images of birds killed by ingesting plastics that increasingly pollute our oceans.

Great Garbage Patch

Photographer Chris Jordan specializes in large-scale works that depict the magnitude of our consumerism and its impact on our environment. In one of the most emotional presentations at PopTech 2009, Jordan shares heart-wrenching images of birds killed by ingesting plastics that increasingly pollute our oceans.

(via poptech)

The Hulk gets angry at hydraulic fracturingMuch like his role as the Hulk in the new ‘Avengers’ movie, actor Mark Ruffalo says his battle against fracking is about ‘fighting for the common good.’

The Hulk gets angry at hydraulic fracturing
Much like his role as the Hulk in the new ‘Avengers’ movie, actor Mark Ruffalo says his battle against fracking is about ‘fighting for the common good.’

(via mad-as-a-marine-biologist)

"Millions of Americans are rediscovering the pleasures of locally grown food. By eating food grown close to home, they can boost their health, reduce their carbon footprint, support a robust local economy, and enhance their sense of community … all while savoring scrumptious, satisfying meals. It’s no wonder that the number of farmers’ markets has more than doubled in the last 15 years, and the number of people getting produce straight from the farm has increased almost twentyfold in the same period!But novice locavores can find themselves stumped by basic questions. What’s the best way to shop at a farmers’ market? Is it possible to eat locally all year long? And just what does one do with braising greens, anyway?Enter The Locavore Way by Amy Cotler. This friendly guide to eating locally gives readers all the information they need to buy, cook, and eat close to home. Cotler covers all the basics — why eat locally, where to find local foods, how to eat locally on a budget, what questions to ask at the farmers’ market, and even how to grow one’s own food. She offers savvy shopping tips, simple guides to preparing whatever is in season, ideas for bringing out the best flavors in farm-fresh foods, and strategies to make the harvest last.”

"Millions of Americans are rediscovering the pleasures of locally grown food. By eating food grown close to home, they can boost their health, reduce their carbon footprint, support a robust local economy, and enhance their sense of community … all while savoring scrumptious, satisfying meals. It’s no wonder that the number of farmers’ markets has more than doubled in the last 15 years, and the number of people getting produce straight from the farm has increased almost twentyfold in the same period!

But novice locavores can find themselves stumped by basic questions. What’s the best way to shop at a farmers’ market? Is it possible to eat locally all year long? And just what does one do with braising greens, anyway?

Enter The Locavore Way by Amy Cotler. This friendly guide to eating locally gives readers all the information they need to buy, cook, and eat close to home. Cotler covers all the basics — why eat locally, where to find local foods, how to eat locally on a budget, what questions to ask at the farmers’ market, and even how to grow one’s own food. She offers savvy shopping tips, simple guides to preparing whatever is in season, ideas for bringing out the best flavors in farm-fresh foods, and strategies to make the harvest last.”

"For twenty years Dan O’Brien struggled to make ends meet on his cattle ranch in South Dakota. But when a neighbor invited him to lend a hand at the annual buffalo roundup, O’Brien was inspired to convert his own ranch, the Broken Heart, to buffalo. Starting with thirteen calves, “short-necked, golden balls of wool,” O’Brien embarked on a journey that returned buffalo to his land for the first time in more than a century and a half.Buffalo for the Broken Heart is at once a tender account of the buffaloes’ first seasons on the ranch and an engaging lesson in wildlife ecology. Whether he’s describing the grazing pattern of the buffalo, the thrill of watching a falcon home in on its prey, or the comical spectacle of a buffalo bull wallowing in the mud, O’Brien combines a novelist’s eye for detail with a naturalist’s understanding to create an enriching, entertaining narrative.”

another reading recommendation

"For twenty years Dan O’Brien struggled to make ends meet on his cattle ranch in South Dakota. But when a neighbor invited him to lend a hand at the annual buffalo roundup, O’Brien was inspired to convert his own ranch, the Broken Heart, to buffalo. Starting with thirteen calves, “short-necked, golden balls of wool,” O’Brien embarked on a journey that returned buffalo to his land for the first time in more than a century and a half.

Buffalo for the Broken Heart is at once a tender account of the buffaloes’ first seasons on the ranch and an engaging lesson in wildlife ecology. Whether he’s describing the grazing pattern of the buffalo, the thrill of watching a falcon home in on its prey, or the comical spectacle of a buffalo bull wallowing in the mud, O’Brien combines a novelist’s eye for detail with a naturalist’s understanding to create an enriching, entertaining narrative.”



another reading recommendation

An environmental student sharing things green.


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