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How Big a Backyard Would You Need to Live Off the Land?
Of course, just having all that land and a few goats and pigs is only the beginning. Don’t forget that not only are you planting seeds and cultivating them, but slaughtering the animals and dressing the meat too (if you eat meat). I suppose you could pay for someone else to butcher your meat if you were squeamish.

How Big a Backyard Would You Need to Live Off the Land?

Of course, just having all that land and a few goats and pigs is only the beginning. Don’t forget that not only are you planting seeds and cultivating them, but slaughtering the animals and dressing the meat too (if you eat meat). I suppose you could pay for someone else to butcher your meat if you were squeamish.

(via dragonsheep)

Extrusion containers press the garden waste into endless benches which can be shortened to any length. After a season or two it returns to nature in form of compost. Studio JURGENBEY for Droog Design 1999 

Extrusion containers press the garden waste into endless benches which can be shortened to any length. After a season or two it returns to nature in form of compost. Studio JURGENBEY for Droog Design 1999 

"Just the thought of “going green” can make you feel blue. Trying to live sustainably sounds like a whole lot of work and a whole lot of deprivation. Well, Josh Piven aims to both shrink your carbon footprint and soothe your eco-anxiety. In a guidebook that’s as funny as it is practical, Piven shows you how to green every room of the house—and have a good time doing it. 
Projects range from the playful (raising trout in your swimming pool) all the way to big-time, serious home alterations (installing a root cellar) that will have your neighbors green with envy. Don’t fret if you’re not a natural wrench-turner: Most of Piven’s suggestions are inexpensive, totally approachable, and accompanied by clear illustrations. This Green House is likely to be the most entertaining homeowner’s manual you’ve ever used.”


Requested read.

"Just the thought of “going green” can make you feel blue. Trying to live sustainably sounds like a whole lot of work and a whole lot of deprivation. Well, Josh Piven aims to both shrink your carbon footprint and soothe your eco-anxiety. In a guidebook that’s as funny as it is practical, Piven shows you how to green every room of the house—and have a good time doing it. 

Projects range from the playful (raising trout in your swimming pool) all the way to big-time, serious home alterations (installing a root cellar) that will have your neighbors green with envy. Don’t fret if you’re not a natural wrench-turner: Most of Piven’s suggestions are inexpensive, totally approachable, and accompanied by clear illustrations. This Green House is likely to be the most entertaining homeowner’s manual you’ve ever used.”



Requested read.
tuuwaisnative:

Reading now

A great short read that incorporates the view of spirituality on how the Earth works. Take a day in a hammock and read this. : ) 

tuuwaisnative:

Reading now

A great short read that incorporates the view of spirituality on how the Earth works. 
Take a day in a hammock and read this. : ) 

Two Years Later, BP Spill Reminders Litter Gulf Coast
How is it actually looking down there? Is BP telling us the truth when they waving their hands wanting us to come visit?

Two Years Later, BP Spill Reminders Litter Gulf Coast

How is it actually looking down there? Is BP telling us the truth when they waving their hands wanting us to come visit?

An environmental student sharing things green.


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