Tagged with sustainable living RSS

How Big a Backyard Would You Need to Live Off the Land?
Of course, just having all that land and a few goats and pigs is only the beginning. Don’t forget that not only are you planting seeds and cultivating them, but slaughtering the animals and dressing the meat too (if you eat meat). I suppose you could pay for someone else to butcher your meat if you were squeamish.

How Big a Backyard Would You Need to Live Off the Land?

Of course, just having all that land and a few goats and pigs is only the beginning. Don’t forget that not only are you planting seeds and cultivating them, but slaughtering the animals and dressing the meat too (if you eat meat). I suppose you could pay for someone else to butcher your meat if you were squeamish.

(via dragonsheep)

"Just the thought of “going green” can make you feel blue. Trying to live sustainably sounds like a whole lot of work and a whole lot of deprivation. Well, Josh Piven aims to both shrink your carbon footprint and soothe your eco-anxiety. In a guidebook that’s as funny as it is practical, Piven shows you how to green every room of the house—and have a good time doing it. 
Projects range from the playful (raising trout in your swimming pool) all the way to big-time, serious home alterations (installing a root cellar) that will have your neighbors green with envy. Don’t fret if you’re not a natural wrench-turner: Most of Piven’s suggestions are inexpensive, totally approachable, and accompanied by clear illustrations. This Green House is likely to be the most entertaining homeowner’s manual you’ve ever used.”


Requested read.

"Just the thought of “going green” can make you feel blue. Trying to live sustainably sounds like a whole lot of work and a whole lot of deprivation. Well, Josh Piven aims to both shrink your carbon footprint and soothe your eco-anxiety. In a guidebook that’s as funny as it is practical, Piven shows you how to green every room of the house—and have a good time doing it. 

Projects range from the playful (raising trout in your swimming pool) all the way to big-time, serious home alterations (installing a root cellar) that will have your neighbors green with envy. Don’t fret if you’re not a natural wrench-turner: Most of Piven’s suggestions are inexpensive, totally approachable, and accompanied by clear illustrations. This Green House is likely to be the most entertaining homeowner’s manual you’ve ever used.”



Requested read.

Hemp Chair

Hemp Chair by Werner Aisslinger; the renewable raw materials hemp and kenaf are compressed with a water-based thermoset binder to form an eco-friendly, lightweight and yet strong composite.

http://www.aisslinger.de/images/stories/projects/2011_hempchair/hempchair_content_006.jpg

(via re-inform)

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SOURCE: FDA, Consumer Reports, Environmental Working Group, Committee of Energy & Commerce, Natural Resources Defense Council, Good Magazine, Container Recycling Institute, International Bottled Water Association. 

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SOURCE: FDA, Consumer Reports, Environmental Working Group, Committee of Energy & Commerce, Natural Resources Defense Council, Good Magazine, Container Recycling Institute, International Bottled Water Association. 

Tips to help out everyone and everything.

Transportation

  • Walk or ride a bike
  • Use public transportation
  • Drive the most fuel-efficient vehicle for your needed task and drive at the most efficient speed for your vehicle
  • Avoid drive-through businesses; don’t idle for more than 30 seconds
  • Keep your car tuned up and maintain proper tire inflation

Home & Work

  • Insulate buildings and heat/cool with efficient systems (e.g., rated by Energy Star)
  • Generate your own power with wind and solar
  • Let your utility company know that you want to subscribe to green power
  • Use energy-efficient (e.g. Energy Star) appliances and equipment. Turn appliances off when not in use. Use low-tech methods when possible (e.g., line-dry clothes)
  • Replace light bulbs with compact fluorescent or other energy-efficient bulbs (see Energy Star)
  • Use no more water than needed 

Dining Table

  • Buy and cook only what you’ll eat. Don’t waste food.
  • Consume foods that are minimally processed and packaged (e.g., potatoes vs. potato chips)
  • Purchase fruits and vegetables grown locally on small-scale farms
  • Avoid products that result from tropical deforestation (e.g., palm oil, coffee that isn’t shade-grown, South American beef)
  • Consume less meat. Eat three meatless meals per week.
  • Consume products like pasture-fed beef, free-range poultry, and wild salmon rather than CAFO (concentrated animal feeding operations) meats. 

Marketplace

  • Minimize consumption: reduce, reuse, and recycle
  • Research vendors and buy from those with sustainable business models
  • Avoid products with excess packaging
  • Buy products created closer to home: for example, if you live in the U.S. or Canada, purchase goods made in North America instead of those shipped from far away.

Social Interactions

  • Vote for political representatives who recognize that our carbon-based society isn’t sustainable and who will work to establish an appropriate price for carbon
  • Interpret the facts about global warming to your friends and relatives
  • Encourage members of your social circles to adopt sustainable lifestyles—and lead by example
  • To help create a stewardship ethic in your community and raise awareness of how lifestyle changes can make a difference, take part in local green initiatives like planting trees, recycling drives, or ride-your-bike to work days—or start your own.

Did You Know?

There are about 100 million households in the U.S. alone, and each household uses about 11,000 KWh electricity per year. It takes one pound of coal to generate 1KWh of electricity. The electricity generated in the U.S. is roughly 50% coal, 25% natural gas, 25% other (nuclear + hydroelectric + renewable). Power generation is somewhat regional – do you know what’s in your area?

A 100W light bulb left on for 10 hours burns one pound of coal.

SOURCE:
 

An environmental student sharing things green.


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